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"During the Late Cretaceous, the group including all modern birds appeared and began to diversify. Those in Hell Creek occupy a water-marginal habitat, much like modern waders. Wide, thin toes allow them to walk over soft mud, while a narrow bill is used to probe for seeds and small invertebrates. Why this group of dinosaurs survived the great extinction has been linked to their close ties to water, incredibly fast growth rates, and ability to feed on seeds. Their survival likely owes to a combination of these factors with a little luck thrown in."

Saurian encyclopedia

The DePalma's Onithuran, is a non-playable ornithurine[1] bird in Saurian.

ClassificationEdit

There have been multiple birds belonging to Ornithurae uncovered from the Hell Creek Formation and they are noteworthy component of the ecosystem of the Bone Butte site in South Dakota.[2] This bird, in particular, appears to be based on an ornithurine shorebird that was discovered in the Bone Butte. The specimen is nearly complete and would have the size of a small duck in life. DePalma (2010) reports that the specimen is currently under further study in preparation for the specimen to receive a description.

[2]

BehaviorEdit

It lived around the waterways of the Bone Butte region.

In SaurianEdit

The DePalma's Ornithuran appears in Saurian. It is portrayed with feathers on pretty much all of the body, including wings on the forearms and a tail fan on the tail. Its' color is mainly white with back wings and markings on its' back and tail, red feet, and a mix of red, yellow, and black on its' beak. The DePalma's Ornithuran serves as a potential food item for the player, but it is hard to catch once the bird spots the player and flies away.

GalleryEdit

DevelopmentEdit

It appears that originally the bird was to be Cimolopteryx, a similar ornithurine which has been found in the Late Maastrichtian Lance Formation of Wyoming and possibly the Hell Creek Formation as well.[3] It had been previously been featured in concept art made by RJ "Arvalis" Palmer.

Notes and referencesEdit

  1. Parker, Tom. (September 1, 2016) Saurian DevLog #2. Saurian Website. Retrieved September 7, 2016.
  2. 2.0 2.1 DePalma II, Robert A. (2010) Geology, Taphonomy, and Paleoecology of a Unique Upper Cretaceous Bonebed Near the Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary in South Dakota. University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas.
  3. Longrich, Nicholes P., Tokaryk, Tim, Field, Daniel J. (2011) Mass extinction of birds at the Cretaceous–Paleogene (K–Pg) boundary. Proceedings of the Natural Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 108(37)